Publications

Projects

London's Business Improvement Districts

Our report with the Association of Town & City Management (ATCM), entitled London\’s Business Improvement Districts, was commissioned by the GLA.

A Business Improvement District (BID) is a geographical area within which the businesses have voted to invest collectively in local improvements to improve their trading environment. There are currently 32 BIDs in London and the Mayor has made a policy commitment both to supporting existing BIDs and to supporting the development of new BIDs – including a target of having 50 BIDs in the capital by 2016.

The purpose of our work was to help the GLA understand the functions and operation of current BIDs and the direction of change likely to impact on BIDs in the coming years, and to look at how the GLA can support their continuing development.

Read the full report here.

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Counties and Economic Growth Report

CCN welcomes the launch of a report from Shared Intelligence on the contribution county council areas make to the economic growth of UK PLC that challenges the government\’s preoccupation with cities as the only means to deliver growth.

As the report clearly demonstrates county areas are responsible for more than half of the economic output outside of London and the government is in danger of strangling the potential for this growth by focusing too heavily on cities.

Read the full report here.

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In areas covered by CCN member councils there is:

0

Total employment 43%
  • 43

    Total employment 43%
  • 54

    Manufacturing employment 54%
  • 57

    Construction employment 57%
  • 57

    Motor industry employment 57%
  • 55

    Scientific R&D employment 55%
  • 60

    Pharmaceutical employment 60%

Envisioning Libraries of the Future

Envisioning Libraries of the Future, commissioned by Arts Council England in 2012, was our second major collaboration with Ipsos MORI. It began with an evidence review of major societal, economic and technological trends that might impact on the future of the library service, which drew heavily on Ipsos MORI own extensive evidence base. This was the basis for a Delphi Enquiry with over 200 invited library practitioners and experts in related fields to understand whether and how those individuals believed these trends would impact on libraries in the coming decade. This in turn enabled us to construct a set of scenarios which we presented, along with a review of innovation in public libraries, at a series of open space workshops with library sector stakeholders including librarians, local politicians, educators, and library campaigners. Throughout the study we also stimulated debate via an online conversation designed to widen the debate and create more opportunities for participation. The website received 13,000 visits from the UK and around the world.

Click here to hear Ben Lee from Shared Intelligence (speaking to the RSA\’s 2020 Public Service Trust) explaining why the messages about social purpose in Envisioning Libraries of the Future are so critical.

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Raising the standard of artistic work by, with and for children and young people

Raising the standard of artistic work by, with and for children and young people, was commissioned by Arts Council England in 2011 from Shared Intelligence working jointly with our partners the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER). The work was to support Arts Council England\’s strategic goal of improving the standard of arts experiences for children and young people by exploring the values and principles that create quality in arts and culture by, with and for children and young people. Alongside NFER\’s comprehensive research and analysis into existing quality and outcomes frameworks Shared Intelligence led a large stakeholder engagement process which included practitioner interviews, workshops to co-produce and validate a set of quality principles which would meet the needs of both Arts Council and the sector, and an online conversation about the quality of young people\’s arts experiences. Our engagement process was an extension of the co-productive approach Arts Council had already established for this work, in which they sought to use their convening power to create the space for practitioner debate about raising quality, without dictating the answers. Following the main research phase Shared Intelligence ran a further stakeholder event for Arts Council in February 2013 in collaboration with Re:Bourne the community and youth arts arm of the Matthew Bourne dance company.

Click here for the main report and click here to hear Ben Lee from Shared Intelligence, with others, explaining the aims of the stakeholder event we designed with Re:Bourne in February 2013.

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